Page 1 of 1

History of Tessellations

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 8:52 pm
by BRDParker
Trying to get some information for some write-ups I'm doing (or simply general knowledge about the subject, as I am asked about it a fair bit), the eventual goal of which would be to write a book. I am trying to find articles, references, et cetera that talk about the history of tessellations in origami.

Here's what I've got so far (largely off the top of my head, but with responses, I'd like to make this more comprehensive):

Books:
Origami Tessellations: Awe-Inspiring Geometric Designs, Eric Gjerde 2008
Solid Origami, Shuzo Fujimoto (original name anyone?) 1976
Twist Origami, Shuzo Fujimoto (date and original name anyone?)
Twist Origami II, Shuzo Fujimoto 1983
Sozo Suru Origami Asobi, Shuzo Fujimoto 1982

Articles:
http://arkinetblog.wordpress.com/2009/1 ... sellation/ - Arkinet
http://www.britishorigami.info/academic ... tessel.php - The Listler List
http://www.britishorigami.info/academic ... agtess.php - The Listler List

Sites:
http://www.origamitessellations.com - Eric Gjerde's blog
http://www.flickr.com/groups/origamitessellations/ - OTess Flickr Group
http://www.flickr.com/groups/corrugation/ - Origami Corrugation Flickr Group, created 2006
http://www.origami-resource-center.com/ ... tions.html - Origami Resource Center
google search for Ron Resh*

*ronresch.com does NOT lead to where it used to. It is NSFW

Re: History of Tessellations

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 2:28 pm
by Nick
I think you need to look at cloth-folding - I supect this was an earlier incarnation of this technique, going back some way.

Personally, I dislike this (mis)use of the term. Wiki says "A tessellation or tiling of the plane is a pattern of plane figures that fills the plane with no overlaps and no gaps." Most of what people call origami tesselations do have gaps. I think of these folds more as twists. Just a semantic point, I guess it's too late to persuade people otherwise now...

Re: History of Tessellations

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 2:48 pm
by BRDParker
Nick wrote:Personally, I dislike this (mis)use of the term. Wiki says "A tessellation or tiling of the plane is a pattern of plane figures that fills the plane with no overlaps and no gaps." Most of what people call origami tesselations do have gaps. I think of these folds more as twists. Just a semantic point, I guess it's too late to persuade people otherwise now...


True, though I tend to look at the gaps as "bits" to the puzzle as well, so it works out in the end. And if you look at the flagstone side of the patterns, the only gaps are resultant of paper thickness, which is probably where the justification lies.

I will do some searching for cloth folding. Thanks

Re: History of Tessellations

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:47 am
by ahudson
Ben, I've got two Imagiro articles I wrote about origami tessellations history-- the first is about waterbomb/flagstone tessellations, and the second is about corrugations, though it needs to be rewritten. I can send them to you now if you'd like, but if you can wait then I'll post a revised version somewhere in a few months.

Chris Palmer's book "Shadowfolds" should probably be on here. Aside from his own designs, he mentions a couple of textile processes that involve repetitive folding, Smocking and Shibori. No technical or historical information is given, but maybe Google will be more helpful.

Joan Sallas' book "Gefaltete Schönheit" has some wonderful illustrations depicting the use of miura-ori and similar pleated patterns in napkin-folding from as early as the 1600s. Not necessarily tessellations in the sense that you're thinking of, but worth mentioning perhaps.

The Japanese name for "Solid Origami" is 立体折り紙 or RITTAI ORIGAMI, and the original names for the Twist Origami series are ねじり折り (1) or NEJIRI ORI (1), with books 2 and 3 following the same title format.

Also keep in mind that Yoshihide Momotani did some early tessellation work. There's a little bit in his 2001 book おりがみドールハウス (Origami Doll's House), and his Stretch Wall was included in Paul Jackson's book "Classic Origami" (1990). I'm sure there's more that I don't have references for, I remember reading somewhere that he had done some origami in the 1980s.

By the way, Nick, when David Lister mentions Mick Guy's framed tessellations, this note is added: (I have one on my wall - Web Ed.) That isn't you, I suppose? I'd be interested in seeing a photo of one of these; I gather that they're multipiece, but I don't know anything beyond that.

Frank van Kollem

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 11:29 am
by Joan Sallas
„In the summer of 2003, Eva Wolff presented a collection of geometrically folded constructions made her by son Frank van Kollem as a gift to the 'Paper Historical Collection' of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (Royal Library in The Hague). The collection had been stored in a small brown suitcase since Frank's death in 1997. It turned out that this treasure chest contained more than 100 folded creations most of which were no more than a few centimetres in size, each in its own plastic sleeve or sevral together in a cigar box. Together they form an intringuing origami collection, made by an exceptional individual. Frank was linguistically gifted and a brillant mathematician and physicist. His fascination for mathematical principles led to a series of unique folded geometric constructions, each one made from one single sheet of paper and created with only the aid of two pairs of pointed tweezers and his own small fingers.“

That's a introduction to the article „Het koffertje van Frank“, writed of Mr. Henk Pork, paper conservator of the Royal Library in The Hague. Sadly, i don't have the bibliographic reference of this article (ca. 2005). Some time ago I visited Mr Pork in The Hague and he showed me the incredible tesselation work of Frank van Kollem. I was really extremly impressed, because I saw never before (or later!) a similar work, so acurate, so fine and so precise. Mr. Pork asked me from which source I think that Frank learned this tesselation technic. From my knowledge and bibliographic references I had no answer for this question. Frank was born 1957 and with 16 years began to fold with the current origami books that appeared until the begin of the 1970s, and he started soon his own geometrical creations. From the 1950s to the 1970s appeared some english and german books about paper craftworks with very simple folded tesselations (Pauline Johnson, Ernst Röttger, Dona Meilach, Kurt Londenberg, Yamada Ito, Florence Temko, John Portchmouth etc.) frequently cutted. But the level of Frank van Kollems work show that his main referent was without doubt his own mathematik thinking.

Frank van Kollem, another key pioneer figure in the history of the modern folding art, that in my opinion needs to be admired and better known for all the folders of today, specially the people interested on tessellations and his history.

Re: History of Tessellations

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 12:14 pm
by ahudson
Found a reference:
H. Porck, ‘Het koffertje van Frank. Geniale papieren vouwsels’, in: P. Gentenaar (samenst.) en A. Westerhof (red.). Geest van papier= Spirit of Paper. Leiden 2004, p. 334-353.

http://www.hollandpapierbiennale.nl/2004.html

http://www.worldcat.org/title/geest-van-papier/oclc/61459175&referer=brief_results

I intend to borrow a copy...

Re: Frank van Kollem

PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:16 pm
by Michel G
In "Origami made in Holland" by Paula Versnick, published by Orihouse in 2008,
some pages, 4 to be exact, are consacred of Frank van Kollem's work.
One text page, 2 CP and one complete diagram.