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"De jonge werkman. Het vlechten" (1881) by Elise van Calcar

PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:22 pm
by Edwin Corrie
I haven't had time to post anything on the forum recently, but here's a book I found which is worth mentioning before I lose the link:

http://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/view?docId=LCSM_200044/ocr.xml;query=calcar;brand=default#page/1/mode/2up

It contains a lot of fascinating early material on paperfolding, napkin folding, weaving and paper cutting, including the type of fold-and-cut animals that Thoki Yenn and Arthur Day used to make. I can't see a way to save a copy of the whole book, but the pages can be copied individually (though there are more than 100, so it would take some time).

Elise van Calcar is mentioned in Joan's napkin folding book as the author of "De kleine papierwerkers" (1865), which contains instructions for a number of paperfolding items. Actually it's a set of four books, and the first volume is about folding ("vouwen"). The second is about weaving and the fourth is about fold-and-cut designs (both of some interest to paperfolders). The third one doesn't seem to be available but is mentioned in the other books.

I: Wat men van een stukje papier al maken kan: het vouwen
II: Wat men uit strookjes papier al vlechten kan
III: Het prikken
IV: Het knippen en plakken

The link for the above is:
http://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/search?keyword=+%09De+kleine+papierwerkers+

Enjoy!

Re: "De jonge werkman. Het vlechten" (1881) by Elise van Cal

PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:31 pm
by Michel G
Good find, Edwin !

It's remains me the book
"Pleasant Work for Busy Fingers or Kindergarten at Home" by Maggie Browne (1891) with a second edition in 1896.
The contents is quite the same except there are not napkin fold and is one more letterfold inside.
The order of the chapter and fold are not the same. But the drawing used are identical.
This book can be saw at http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085050/00001

And as you can see in his preface "Pleasant work for busy fingers" is :
"..., although not a mere translation, founded upon "Des Kindes erstes Beschäftigungsbuch," by E. Barth and W. Niederley.
In putting together this little book, I have omitted much from the German work that seemed unsuitable, or too difficult, for the boys and girls for whom I have prepared it."

So a question now by transitivity
Is the book "De jonge werkman. Het vlechten" (1881) by Elise van Calcar a translation of
"Des Kindes erstes Beschäftigungsbuch," by E. Barth and W. Niederley (1st edition 1877) ?

Re: "De jonge werkman. Het vlechten" (1881) by Elise van Cal

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:05 pm
by Edwin Corrie
Very interesting Michel. I didn't know about "Pleasant Work for Busy Fingers", but it seems it is available as a modern reprint:

http://www.amazon.com/Pleasant-Work-For-Busy-Fingers/dp/1444655574

But with a bit of searching I was able to find an original edition, which I've ordered. It's apparently in poor condition and only has 200 pages, whereas the reprint has 330. I'll try to comment here when it arrives.

"Des Kindes erstes Beschäftigungsbuch" (1877) is mentioned in Joan's napkin folding book too, but I haven't seen it or found it online.

Re: "De jonge werkman. Het vlechten" (1881) by Elise van Cal

PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 8:44 am
by JGimeno
Maggie Browne's book Pleasant Work for Busy Fingers, or Kindergarten at Home was cited by Florence Temko in the magazine British Origami(No. 148, June 1991), p. 24: "Reviews: An antique":
An Origami book dated1896? Yes, indeed. It's called "Pleasant Work for Busy Fingers, or Kindergarten at Home" by Maggie Browne, published by Cassell and Company. I received at yellowed copy in otherwise good condition, through the kindness of a friend who discoveredit an antique store.
The book contains nine chapters, telling the story of four children who are banished from home becauseof their mother's illness. They were miserable at the thought of visiting Aunt Pollie, but she endears herself by teaching them Paperfolding and other paper crafts.
The Paper-folding chapter shows how to cut a square from notepaper and form it into variations of the salt-cellar or multi-form, up to the difficultyof the Chinese Junk. The sailboat that turns into a hat is made here from notepaper, rather than from newspaper. In addition Aunt Pollie teaches the dart airplane, the bellows, the banger and two letter folds. Quite a lot to present clearly in 47 pages, interwoven with conversations between the children and their aunt. It is a truly charming book.
Florence Temko

Re: "De jonge werkman. Het vlechten" (1881) by Elise van Cal

PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 9:10 pm
by Michel G
Is precisely this article in the BO mag 148 (June 1991) who permit me to know the Maggie Browne's book "Pleasant Work for Busy Fingers, or Kindergarten at Home" and after to find the "cheap edition" from 1896 at http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085050/00001
The original edition is 1891.
Have a thought to the memory of the late Florence Temko (1921 - 2009)

Re: "De jonge werkman. Het vlechten" (1881) by Elise van Cal

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 8:56 am
by Edwin Corrie
I just received my copy of "Pleasant Work for Busy Fingers" (1896) and am happy to say it is in quite reasonable condition and has the full 330 pages (not 200 as advertised). It seems to be identical to the digital copy which Michel linked to. The contents are largely the same as those of Calcar's book, but the main difference is the text. "Het vlechten" is like a text book, whereas "Pleasant Work" is in the form of a dialogue between two children and their aunt who is teaching them how to fold and cut paper. Also, as Michel notes, there is no napkin folding in "Pleasant Work".

Thanks also to Juan for finding the Florence Temko article. We must have all read that when the magazine came out, but it means a lot more now that we can see the book.