CARD

The history of paperfolding

CARD

Postby JGimeno » Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:56 pm

CUT AWAY AND FOLDED CARDS

Some confectionery recipes talk about to apply the cards to make the mold instead a paper mold, as example, the Saboyan sponge cake recipe, recommended «se distribuirá sobre moldes de hoja de lata, o de naipes, que estarán untados, unos, y otros con un poco de manteca de puerco, aunque no de modo que no se engrase sino lo suficiente para contener la pasta» (to distribute the pastry cook in a tinplate or card mold, both previously spread with lard, just enough to contain the pastry, but not too much) [Juan de la Mata: Arte de repostería. Madrid, Imprenta Joseph García Lanza, 1755, (pp. 94-95).]. Parallel bibliographies about card talk about cut away and folded -or both in same time- spared cards from incomplete packs of cards, to get shapes, some times from "modular folded", like the R.C. "caja de naipes" (card box) explained in 1847 [R. C.: Juegos de los Niños (traducidos de los mejores manuales acabados de publicar en París, Madrid, Imprenta de R. y Fonseca, 1847 (pp. 55-56). In the same book it exists other examples on folded and cuts of cards: "molinos de viento", "carros", "púlpitos", "capuchinos", "sillones", "sillas", "mesas", "cubos", "cestas", "canastillos", "casitas", "arlequines", "cadenas", "sombras chinescas", etc].

There are some children playing with folded cards pictures, the most famous from Jean-Baptiste Chardin [Jean-Baptiste Chardin: The House of Cards (ca. 1735) in the National Gallery of London. There exist other four versions of this picture: National Gallery of Art, of Washington; Musée du Louvre, of Paris, in the palace Waddesdon Manor, in Buckinghamshire and Galleria degli Uffizi, in Florence], but I consider much more interesting another one who shows two kids have making a modular cube with six folded cards. ¿Somebody knows something about this picture?
Attachments
Niños jugando con naipes.jpg
Niños jugando con naipes.jpg (55.93 KiB) Viewed 15194 times
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Re: CARD

Postby Nick » Mon Mar 12, 2012 10:19 pm

An amazing image! The model is, of course, the same principle as Jackson's cube, only inside out.
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Re: CARD

Postby jtbm71 » Wed Mar 14, 2012 8:21 pm

Juan,
do you have more information about the picture? May be it could be a photomontage.

Good luck,

Jose Tomas Buitrago
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Re: CARD

Postby JGimeno » Wed Mar 14, 2012 9:48 pm

I haven't information about this work. I haven't reason to think it is a photomontage.
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Re: CARD

Postby Joan Sallas » Wed Mar 14, 2012 9:58 pm

of course, from the technic perspective it could be a montage, but in my opinion/intuition I think like Juan: that isn't a montage.

In the anonym book "Getijdenboek van Catharina van Kleef" [The Hours Book of Catherine of Cleves, 1417-1479], illustrated in Utrecht ca. 1440, the folded boxes that appair look exactly like a photoshop montage, but aren't a montage, they are incredible real.

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Re: CARD

Postby jtbm71 » Thu Mar 15, 2012 5:28 pm

Hello.
Sorry for my assumptions. I did an image search and this is the information about the painting:

K. Pavlov (1792 - 1852)
Children playing. 1837
Oil on canvas
Pskov State United Historical and Architectural Museum-Reserve

By the way, in this painting by François Hubert Drouais (French, 1727–1775), Boy with a House of Cards, there is a monk made of a card. Is this traditional? Where can I fond some directions?

Good luck,

Jose Tomas Buitrago
Attachments
François Hubert Drouais (French, 1727–1775), Boy with a House of Cards.jpg
François Hubert Drouais (French, 1727–1775), Boy with a House of Cards.jpg (63.69 KiB) Viewed 15138 times
K.S.Pavlov. Children Playing, 1837.jpg
K.S.Pavlov. Children Playing, 1837.jpg (134.41 KiB) Viewed 15138 times
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Re: CARD

Postby Joan Sallas » Thu Mar 15, 2012 5:59 pm

Bravo José Tomás! a very good resultat in your research!.....

In this web is some info about the ukranian artist Kapitonov Pavlov:
http://ukrmap.su/en-uh9/1041.html

"(...) The first Ukrainian artists in the works which were features of the new style became John Soshenka (1807–1876), Kapitonov Pavlov (1792–1852), Gabriel Vasko (1820-1866). All they got in art education St. Petersburg Academy of Arts, where he has been combining teaching activities, teaching drawing, painting with occupation. (...) From works Kapytona Pavlov, who came to us, it is clear that the master worked mostly in portrait genre, sometimes enlivening their works mundane details. This is evidenced, in particular, his "Self Portrait" "Portrait of the artist's daughter", "Boy with a dove." However, among his works are and genre paintings ("Children build a card house", "Bondar"), landscapes ("Church of Christ Pantocrator in Poltava"). Was characteristic style of the master decent color palette, realistic style of drawing, interesting chiaroscuro modeling faces of the characters. (...)"

About the very interesting painting of Drouais, you're right, the resultat looks like the double blinzed monkey traditional in Japan (see also Kasahara "The Art and Wonder of Origami", 2004), but is not in the same way folded (here a simply genial 1 fold - 1 cut - 1 fold) and I think here it is not represented a money, but a person (perhaps a king - look also the king-card inside of the 'castle'). The tradition paper fold-cut-unfold to obtain a decorative object, a letterfold-document or as in this case, a toy, was developed in Europe almost since the 17th century, paralel to other folding technics with paper or with textil as the troublewit, that was used not only as a toy, but as a decorative and useful object too.

Again gratulations!

joan
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Re: CARD

Postby JGimeno » Thu Mar 15, 2012 10:39 pm

Congratulations José Tomás: 1st because you have located the auttor of the enigmatic picture and, in 2nd place, you have found another picture with a figure with folded card. I thinks it’s the “capuchino” [the capuchin monk] citing by R.C.
Finally, I would comment that the cube of cards it was represented graphically by Gaston Tissandier in his "Récréations Scientifiques".
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k110526x/f73.image
Although this 3rd editions is undated, it is believed to be 1882.
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Re: CARD (Monk - Capuchino)

Postby jtbm71 » Fri Mar 16, 2012 1:49 pm

Hello,
here another painting with a card monk. the date is circa 1806

CHAUDET-HUSSON Jeanne Elisabeth (painter) 1767-1832
Marie Laetitia Murat (1802-1859) portant un buste de Napoleon

And there is anoher thing there...

Good luck,

Jose Tomas Buitrago
Attachments
CHAUDET-HUSSON Jeanne Elisabeth, Marie-Laetitia-Murat-portant-un-buste-de-Napoleon.jpg
CHAUDET-HUSSON Jeanne Elisabeth, Marie-Laetitia-Murat-portant-un-buste-de-Napoleon.jpg (28.75 KiB) Viewed 15121 times
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Re: CARD

Postby JGimeno » Fri Mar 16, 2012 6:03 pm

Very good input!
This painting oil on canvas, there are two copies in the Palace Museum Fontaineleau.
The approximate date can not exceed 1806 (exhibited at the Salon des artistes français, Paris of that year) or before 1802, when Marie-Laetitia was born. Therefore, the earliest date consistent with the age of the child should be 1806.
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