The Pajarita

The history of paperfolding

The Pajarita

Postby Tamsyn Francoise » Sat Mar 24, 2012 5:36 pm

As you probably already know, the most ancien Spanish folded model known as pajarita ( or cocotte en français) appears in a French painting by Carolus Duran of Paris 1870.
See attachments.
This painting «The Merrymakers» shows three women and a baby sitting around a table , with a live bird and paper folded one (pajarita).
David Lister refers to it,in one of his article «The Pajarita».
I thought, it would be interesting to mention .
As we can find many references of origami (pliage..) literature books , illustrations or drawings, I wonder if there are others western paintings showing paper folded models.?
Attachments
Carolus Duran .The Merrymakers 1870.jpg
Carolus Duran .The Merrymakers 1870.jpg (90.39 KiB) Viewed 11903 times
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Re: The Pajarita

Postby jtbm71 » Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:24 am

Actually, The Merrymakers is not the most ancient painting with models, there are at least two examples (may be there are more) older than 1870.
One is "The Boy with the Book" by P. Petrov (1855), which is at the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow.
The other is a painting by CHAUDET-HUSSON Jeanne Elisabeth, "Marie Laetitia Murat portant un buste de Napoleon" dated about 1806.

Good luck,

Jose Tomas Buitrago
Attachments
CHAUDET-HUSSON Jeanne Elisabeth, Marie-Laetitia-Murat-portant-un-buste-de-Napoleon.jpg
CHAUDET-HUSSON Jeanne Elisabeth, Marie-Laetitia-Murat-portant-un-buste-de-Napoleon.jpg (28.75 KiB) Viewed 11891 times
Petrov- The boy with the book-1855-1.jpg
Petrov- The boy with the book-1855-1.jpg (76.57 KiB) Viewed 11891 times
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Re: The Pajarita

Postby Edwin Corrie » Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:44 pm

It's interesting to see paintings that show folded objects. There have been several topics with pictures like these already on this forum - I wonder if it would be possible to collect them all together somewhere as a growing reference archive. The same could be done for links to old books found on the Internet. Perhaps it could be in a "members only" area so that the information is not too freely available (I've seen privately printed books for sale on Amazon that are simply collections of articles from Wikipedia, i.e. the information has been taken and used by someone else for profit).
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Re: The Pajarita

Postby Nick » Wed Mar 28, 2012 3:21 pm

Edwin Corrie wrote:Perhaps it could be in a "members only" area


Since all memberships (so far) have been approved, we've no way of making these secure.

If it was more private, how would we decide who to admit?
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Re: The Pajarita

Postby Edwin Corrie » Wed Mar 28, 2012 4:57 pm

The moderators already decide who to admit. Other forums have some parts that are freely available to all and some that are restricted to registered members. If someone registers they probably have an interest, but if someone just happens to find the site and sees a chance to exploit the results of other people's research it would be a shame (as in the Wikipedia example, or the "Finger Fertig" book that uses images of napkin folding).

Don't know, it's just an idea.
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Re: The Pajarita

Postby Nick » Thu Mar 29, 2012 2:19 pm

>The moderators already decide who to admit.

So far, everynoe who has applied!

>Other forums have some parts that are freely available to all and some that are restricted to registered members.

Yes, that's easy to do, but what does it achieve, in reality? They'd just have to register to gain access.

>a chance to exploit the results of other people's research

Personally, I'm uneasy with the idea of using the web to restrict the flow of information rather than the other way round, but if subscribers wish to pursue the idea, it's not difficult to implement.
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