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The development of English Flatware began in the late 17th century and most of the traditional patterns originate from this period. The widespread adoption of Flatware services at this time was a result of two major influences. Firstly, the return of the English court from exile on the Continent where the use of knives, spoons and forks for eating was widespread. Until that time forks were not in common use in England. Secondly, at around this time it became common etiquette to provide guests with a set of all the necessary knives, forks and spoons instead of each guest bringing their own.

Listed below are some of the select patterns supplied by Fletcher Robinson Ltd. Many of them offer a choice of style, for example 3 or 4 pronged forks. Click on any image to see a larger version.

Trifid
A delightful pattern that was popular during the period of James II.

Trifid with Cannon Knife
A very modern, Scandinavian looking pattern with roots back to the 17th Century.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: Cannon, Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, Trifid.

Shield Top with Plain Pistol Knife
A late 17th century pattern with modern overtones, often referred to as Dog Nose in the antique pieces.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks. Appropriate Knives: Cannon, Pistol Handles, and straight handles.

Rib-Rattail or Queen Anne with Octagonal Pistol Knife
The most classic pattern, yet easily used in a modern setting.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks.
Appropriate knives: Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, Old English, Cannon.

Rib-Rattail or Queen Anne with Plain Pistol Knife
The most classic pattern, yet easily used in a modern setting.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks.
Appropriate knives: Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, Old English, Cannon.

Early English with Plain Pistol knife
A modern version of Rib-Rattail / Queen Anne with roots in the early 18th Century. It has no rib running down the handle and has a slightly thicker handle head .

Available with 3 or 4 prong Forks.
Appropriate Knives: Plain Pistol,
Old English, Cannon.

Early English with Octagonal Pistol knife
A modern version of Rib-Rattail / Queen Anne. It has no rib running down the handle and has a slightly thicker handle head than Rib-Rattail/Queen Anne.

Available with 3 or 4 prong Forks.
Appropriate Knives: Plain Pistol,
Old English, Cannon.

Hollow Rib with Octagonal Pistol Knife
A pattern which accentuates the rib running down the handle of Rib-Rattail/Queen Anne.

Available with 3 or 4 prong Forks. Appropriate Knives: Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, Old English, Cannon.

English Shell with a Straight Blade Knife
The first introduction of patterning for flatware services.

Available with 3 or 4 prong Forks. All Spoon and Fork handles can be turned up or down. Appropriate Knives: English Shell, Onslow Pistol.

English Shell with a Finger Point Blade Knife
The first introduction of patterning for flatware services.

Available with 3 or 4 prong Forks. All Spoon and Fork handles can be turned up or down. Appropriate Knives: English Shell, Onslow Pistol.

Paul de Lamerie
This pattern was created by Paul de Lamerie, a French Huguenot, who was trained as a silversmith in England in the late 17th century.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: Lamerie Pistol, Onslow Pistol

Onslow
This pattern developed from the fan part of the shell. It was later given a more linear appearance in the Art Deco period.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: Onslow Pistol, Onslow Straight, and Cannon.

Scroll
The pattern scrolls over onto the back in this version of Onslow.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: Onslow Pistol, Straight, Cannon.

Round English
A version of "Old English" with a well rounded appearance over its complete length. There is an emphasis on purity of line and the beauty of smooth rounded surfaces. First generally produced from 1790.

Round English with Finger Point Blade Knife
A very plain pattern which adapts easily to modern or traditional settings.

Available with 3 or 4 prong Forks. All Spoon and Fork handles can be turned up or down. Appropriate Knives: Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, Old English, Cannon.

Irish Ribb
Introduced into Ireland about 1780.

English Thread with Finger Point Blade Knife
All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or turned down.

Available only with 4 prongs. Appropriate knives: English Thread and Cannon.

Old English Thread
First produced in France, then generally from about 1780-1790. Spoons can be required with nibs front or back.

English Thread with Straight Blade Knife
All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or turned down.

Available only with 4 prongs. Appropriate knives: English Thread and Cannon.

Feather Edge with Finger Point Blade Knife
All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or turned down.

Available with 3 or 4 prong Forks. Appropriate Knives: Feather Edge, Feathered Octagonal Pistol

Plain Fiddle
Modern in its straightforward plainness, it was created in the middle of the 18th Century and was popular in Colonial America. All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or down and with or without the pip. They can be made without the wing at the bowl end of the handle.

Available only with 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: Old English, London Octagonal, Plain Spire, Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, and Cannon.

Fiddle Thread with Finger Point Blade Knife
Modern in its straightforward plainness, it was created in the middle of the 18th Century and was popular in Colonial America. All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or down and with or without the pip. They can be made without the wing at the bowl end of the handle.

Available only with 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: English Thread and Cannon.

Fiddle Thread with Straight Blade Knife
Modern in its straightforward plainness, it was created in the middle of the 18th Century and was popular in Colonial America. All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or down and with or without the pip. They can be made without the wing at the bowl end of the handle.

Available only with 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: English Thread and Cannon.

Fiddle Thread & Shell
Iit was created in the middle of the 18th Century and was popular in Colonial America. All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or down and with or without the pip.

Available only with 4 prong forks. Appropriate knives: Thread and Shell, Reed and Shell, and Lamerie Pistol.

Kings
A traditional Regency period pattern produced in the 1790's.

All spoon and fork handles are available turned up or down and can be made without the wing at the bowl end of the handle. Available only with 4 prongs. Appropriate knife: Kings, Reed, and Shell.

Irish Ribb with Plain Spire Finger Point Knife
A very plain pattern, similar to Round English except that it has pointed handles.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks. All spoon and fork handles can be turned up or down. Appropriate Knives: Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, Old English, Cannon

Irish Ribb with Plain Spire Straight Blade Knife
A very plain pattern which adapts easily to modern or traditional settings.

Available with 3 or 4 prong forks. All Spoon and Fork handles can be turned up or down. Appropriate knives: Plain Pistol, Octagonal Pistol, Old English, Cannon

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